Embodied carbon emissions in the construction sector account for over 23 per cent of total greenhouse gas emissions in Australia. Over and above operational processes like energy and transport, it is increasingly important to consider the embodied carbon emissions in building materials used in the sector.

Responsibly sourced wood is the only renewable building material available; it is naturally grown and removes CO2 from the atmosphere. Wood products then store the carbon that the growing trees have removed from the air (about 50% of the dry weight of wood is carbon).

The production and processing of wood uses much less energy – called embodied energy – than most other building materials, giving wood products a significantly lower carbon footprint. Wood can be used to substitute for materials that require larger amounts of fossil fuels to be produced.

There are many benefits of using responsibly sourced wood.

Here in Australia, the embodied carbon emissions in the construction sector account for over 23 per cent of all carbon emissions.

To effectively tackle climate change we need to remove CO2 from the atmosphere as well as reduce carbon emissions. Responsibly sourced wood manages to achieve both of these.

This is because wood stores carbon and has a much lower embodied energy than other major building materials, which are non-renewable and require large amounts of fossil fuels to produce.

Reference: Timber as a Sustainable Building Material – University of Tasmania